I’m revisiting some older research of mine, so that I can talk a little bit about some data visualization I did along the way. If you frequent TriZPUG or the SplatSpace, you might have seen my original presentation, but In Case You Missed It…

You might remember a while back I got interested in researching the statistical thermodynamics of poker tournaments. To briefly recap, I was treating the distribution of chips amongst players as a probability distribution, which meant that I could use the concept of entropy to describe the distribution. Entropy in thermodynamic systems is associated with how ‘spread out’ the energy is in that system: A hot cup of coffee in a cold room has low entropy while warm coffee in a warm room has high entropy. In a statistical system like a poker table, entropy measures how evenly distributed the chips are between the players. When the players start the tournament with equal amounts, the entropy is at a maximum. When one player wins all the chips, the entropy is at a minimum. Already things are interesting – entropy in this statistical system must decrease with time, in stark contrast with the second law of thermodynamics. And we haven’t even looked at what happens between those two points!

Poker entropy

Poker entropy

To better understand the behavior of tournaments, I needed a way to play them and replay them, to turn them into something other than tables of names and numbers. The first representation worked well at illustrating the distribution, but failed to capture the dynamics; except in catastrophic rearrangements, it was not always obvious how the chips moved around from hand to hand.

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What’s going on is, I’ve whimsically renamed the players for anonymity, and then represented the size of their stack with a circle. Each hand is then represented by a transaction in which chips flow from one or more players to a single winner, with chip flow represented by black lines whose size is representative of the magnitude of flow. I find this hypnotic.

If you don’t care about coding, feel free to skip down….

How exactly did I put this together?

Zeroeth, we have to get our tools together.

import pickle, sys    #file IO utilities
import pygame    #pygame library
from pygame.locals import *    #more pygame stuff
from math import sin, cos, pi, sqrt    #math tools

First, there is a great deal of tedious regular expression slicing and dicing that you have to do to convert a tournament history file into usable data; I’ll be merciful and skip that. So I’ve finally bundled up the data in a couple of files.

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